Your questions and comments.

I value your feedback and suggestions. Please don’t hesitate to leave your thoughts on my posts, articles or pictures.

I also welcome any questions you may have. I am not the expert around the block, but hopefully I will be able to help you in some way. I started this blog with the intention of ‘learning by sharing’ what I know. If I don’t have the answer to a specific question, I’ll be candid with you. But that will give me a reason to learn more on that and share the information and my findings to you all. So it will be a win-win situation for all of us.

Thank you – Liju Augustine

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12 Responses to Your questions and comments.

  1. How do I show you my pics?

    • How about creating a flickr account and upload your pictures. Post a link here, once you have the pictures out there.
      Btw, I looked at the pictures from your website. They look really nice. Are they all your work?

      Thanks
      LA

  2. Hi. I read your articles on metering with the Nikon D90 and it really helped. I went out and did a bit of practicing and thought you might want to take a peek at my results of my first attempt at using a gray card.
    I do have a question, however. I have an add-on flash (equivalent to an SB600) and use a Gary Fong cloud difuser. My question is, how will the flash affect the gray card readings? How do I work it? Do I take the gray card reading and then go down an f stop or so to compensate for the flash, or is there a way to calculate that flash in the gray card reading?

    • Kathryn,

      I am still learning flash photography, but I will explain how I use my SB-900.

      1. Set the ISO to 400 (in most cases)
      2. Change camera to manual mode
      3. Dial in the aperture that gives me the sharpest picture (F4 or F5.6 on my glass)
      4. Adjust the shutter to a value depending on how much ambient light I want in my picture (slower shutter speed will let more ambient light)
      5. Set the flash mode to TTL (or TTL-BL)
      6. Set the WB to auto in most cases
      7. If I have a grey card with me I take a picture with the grey card in the scene after all of the above settings and use it as reference (will explain why)
      8. That’s it I am ready for the actual picture.

      I shoot in RAW and the reference picture that I mentioned above will be used to adjust the WB if my WB is way off the normal tone. I do my flash pictures this way because, in flash photography, the exposure is mainly controlled by the flash. So I don’t actually use a gray card to measure the exposure when using flash. I may be wrong with certain assumptions here, but I usually get good pictures with the above settings. I don’t know if that’s pure luck or not. Try it out and let me know if you see the same result that I see.

      Thanks
      Liju Augustine

  3. David Olshan says:

    Hi Liju. I did some experimenting with exposures today in my backyard. My intent was to get a correct, pleasing exposure. Please have a look and let me know what you think.

    Landscape_027
    • David,

      The pictures look nice. Did you try taking the pictures with and without the Whibal card? In scenes like this, my guess is that the card won’t do much help. One experiment I would do is to take a picture of some object in a room with normal lighting. First take it with auto setting. Then use your Whibal card and take another shot in the same lighting condition. The picture with your Whibal card should give you the accurate color combination.

      Thanks

      • David Olshan says:

        I didn’t use the WhiBal card for these shots as it was getting dark and the WhiBal was barely visible. I did try the card for a few test shots before that and the results were phenomenal. It absolutely nailed the right colors both indoors and out. I just took a shot with the card in the scene and one without. Using Capture NX2 I corrected the white balance off of the card and copies the settings to the other photos. Very quick, easy, and perfect. My indoor shots had a blue color cast which the WhiBal corrected (the whites became white instead of bluish). I posted the before and after here:
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidolshan/sets/72157625047661580/

      • David,

        You are right, the card really works, at least that’s what your experiment shows. Enjoy it. Thanks for sharing the information.

  4. David Olshan says:

    I did get the WhiBal card today and I do not know how I ever lived without it. It does an amazing job of setting the perfect white balance with zero effort and zero guessing. I also got “Understanding Exposure” from my local library and I like it very much so far.

  5. David Olshan says:

    I look forward to following your blog as I would like to share experiences with fellow beginners. I like many of the photos you posted. What post-processing have you done on them? On some of them the colors are overly vivid, almost like an overdone HDR attempt. It’s fine if you like that style, but it makes the images look unnatural. Thanks for your posts. I am using a D40, 18-55mm kit lens, 55-200mm VR, and 35mm/1.8 prime. I haven’t taken the plunge for a speedlight yet, although that is in the future. I just ordered a Whibal card for settting while balance in RAW mode. If it works as advertised, it should do wonders for my shots.

    • David,

      Thanks for your comments. I too look forward to your ideas and suggestions.
      The only software I own is Capture NX2 from Nikon. I use it to convert the RAW files and to process the images (minimally though). I like the pictures to be vivid and colorful, especially outdoor shots. I even customized the Vivid picture control to add more saturation. So the vivid nature of my pictures are mainly due to that. But, I have to admit that I added a little more saturation and warmth to some of the pictures and probably those are the ones you are talking about.

      I would be interested to know how your Whibal card works. Please let me know how useful it is. Another idea would be to use a Grey (18%) card to identify the exposure. If you haven’t already, I would suggest you read the book “Understanding Exposure” by Bryan Peterson. You will love it

      Liju Augustine

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